Horse Feeds-

Farm - Home - Lawn & Garden Supplies - Serving Western New York

Horse Feed 

“OUR” horse feed is unique because it is blended with the most natural ingredients. Corn and oats are primarily used – however, you can have your own personal ration blended. We offer a variety of feeds for a variety of horses. We manufacture “OUR” 16% horse pellets; “OUR” 12% horse pellets and “OUR” Magic 12 horse, which is 12%. We also have a sweet feed that contains 9% protein.

Tips On Proper Feeding

1).  Horses should be fed at least twice per day – three times is ideal.

2). Many of your unexpected health problems can be solved if you treat periodically for internal parasites. This procedure could save feed, and greatly reduce troubles from colic.

3). A mature horse will possibly drink up to 12 gallons of water per day. Always provide plenty of fresh, clean water – except when the horse is warm. If the horse drinks cold water after an intense workout it could lead to founder.

Energy – An Important Factor In Horse Feeding

Cereal grains are fed as a major source of energy and all the common grains are excellent for horses. Oats are the traditional grain for horses. Oats are higher in fiber and lower in digestible energy. Corn, which is lower in protein and higher in digestible energy, is also an excellent source for horses – it is more economical than oats as well.

By – Products

There are a number of by – products of the food and feed industries. Many of these supply the much needed digestible energy needed by horses, such by – products include beet pulp, citrus pulp, hominy feed and oatmeal.

Forages

Feeding horses pasture and hay are by far the most important forms of forages employed. Some of the most popular cool season grasses in horse production are: Kentucky Blue Grass, Timothy, Orchard Grass & Tall Fescue.

Plant Protein

Soybean meal, cotton seed meal and linseed meal are the most important sources of supplemental plant protein.

Fats – An Important Factor In Energy Sources

Fats are a high energy source containing twice as many calories per pound as protein or carbohydrates. A diet without any fat will result in reduced growth, scaly skin and a rough and thin hair coat. An addition you might want to try is corn oil. This is a polyunsaturated fat and will add bloom to your horse’s coat. Fats are most beneficial to horses with high energy requirements.

Carbohydrates Should Not Be Overlooked When Considering Energy

Carbohydrates – sugar, starch and cellulose are major sources of energy in the horse’s ration. Roughages or fibrous feed contain cellulose, which is also composed of glucose. These are broken down by the enzymes in the large intestine and cecum. Such breakdowns yield volatile fatty acids and enable the horse to use roughage.

Composition Of Some Common Grains:

Grain          Protein        Fiber           Calcium %   Phosphorus    TDN   

Barley         11%              6%                .08                 .40                    72 

Brewer's     26%              15%              .27                 .50                    60 

Grains

Corn         9%                 2%               .02                 .31                    80 

(Yellow)

Distiller"s   27%              12%              .09                 .37                    75

(Grains)

(Corn)

Oats         12%               11%             .10                 .35                    65

Rye         12%               02%             .06                 .34                    72

Grain       11%               02%             .04                 .29                    76

(Sorghum)

Wheat       13%              3%                .05                 .36                    79 

With the proper mixtures of roughages and grams you can obtain maximum efficiency from your horse.

Composition Of Some Common Roughages:

Roughage      Protein           Fiber (%)           Calcium           Phosphorus

Alfalfa         15                    29                     1.40                  .24

Alfalfa Meal    17                    24                     1.50                  .35

dehydrated

Bluegrass       09                    30                     .46                    .32

(Hey)

Bromegrass   10                    29                     .32                    .20

(Hey)

Clovergrass   13                    27                     1.35                   .19

(Red)

   Fescue         08                    30                      .44                    .28

(Red)

  Oat Hey       08                    28                      .23                     .21

  Orchardgrass 09                    30                     .35                    .25

(Hey)

Timothy Hay   07                    30                     .25                    .20

Trefoil          14                    29                     1.40                  .22

Birdsfoot

Proteins – The Building Blocks To Your Horse

Proteins are highly complex. In addition to hydrogen, carbon and oxygen, proteins contain nitrogen. Some proteins also contain sulfur and a few contain phosphorous and iron. Each protein is made up of several amino acids. The chemical arrangement of these amino acids determines the quality of the protein.

Proteins that are eaten eventually become muscles, internal organs and bone. If excessive protein is fed to the horse, the nitrogen portion of the protein can be separated from the rest of the nutrient and be discarded as urine. The remaining materials can be converted into energy by the animal.

Protein Requirements

Class of Horse                                                                               % of Ration

In creep Rations                                                                                 14-16

Weanlings                                                                                           14-16

Yearlings                                                                                            12-14

Mature Horse                                                                                      8-10

Pregnant Mares                                                                                  11-12

Lactating Mares                                                                                  12-14

*Sweet Feed

"Our" Sweet Feed

Guaranteed Analysis
Crude Protein (min.)….. 9.0%

Crude Fat (min.) ………3.0%

Crude Fiber (max.) ……9.0%


Ingredients:

Grain products, cane molasses, salt, dicalcium phosphate, ground limestone, Vitamin A, D & E supplement.

“OUR” 16% Horse Pellets

Guaranteed Analysis
Crude Protein (min.)……12%

Crude Fat (min.)……….. 2.5%

Crude Fiber (max.)…….. 6.5%

Ingredients:

Grain products, plant protein products, Processed grain by-products, can molasses, dicalcium phosphate, ground limestone, salt, zinc oxide, ferrous carbonate, manganese sulfate, copper oxide, cobalt carbonate, Vitamin A, D & E supplement, sodium selenite.

“OUR” 16% Horse Pellets

Guaranteed Analysis
Crude Protein (min.)….. 16%

Crude Fat (min.) ……… 2.5%

Crude Fiber (max.) …… 6.5%

Ingredients:

Grain products, plant protein products, processed grain by-products, cane molasses, dicalcium phosphate, ground limestone, salt, zinc oxide, ferrous carbonate, manganese sulfate, copper oxide, cobalt carbonate, Vitamin A, D & E supplement, sodium selenite.

“OUR” 12% Horse Pellets

Guaranteed Analysis
Crude Protein (min.) …..12%

Crude Fat (min.) ………2.5%

Crude Fiber (max.) …..  6.5%

Ingredients:

Grain products, plant protein products, processed grain by-products, cane molasses, dicalcium phosphate, ground limestone, salt, zinc oxide, ferrous carbonate, manganese sulfate, copper oxide, cobalt carbonate, Vitamin A, D & E supplement, sodium selenite.

Feeding Management

Varying the proportions of roughages and concentrates can be used in the management of horses to: (1) control energy intake; (2) maintain normal digestive tract fill; (3) minimize digestive dysfunctions and regulate consumption of feed by horses that are fed in groups concentrate to roughage ratio.

Vitamins and Minerals Very Important Combinations

Other Minerals and Vitamins for Horses and Ponies
( on a dry matter basis)

Maintenance

Pregnant & Lactating

Mares

Maximum Growing

Horses

Working Horses

Tolerance Levels

Adequate Concentrations in Total Rations

Minerals

Sulfur (%)

Iron

(mg/kg)

Manganese (mg/kg)

Copper

(mg/kg)

Zinc

(mg/kg)

Selenium (mg/kg)

Iodine

(mg/kg)

Cobalt

Vitamins

Vitamin A (IU/kg)

Vitamin D (IU/kg)

Vitamin E (IU/kg)

Vitamin K (IU/kg)

Thiamin

(mg/kg)

Riboflavin (mg/kg)

Niacin

(mg/kg)

Pyridoxine (mg/kg)

Pantothenic acid (mg/kg)

Biotin

(mg/kg)

Niacin

(mg/kg)

Folacin

(mg/kg)

Vitamin B12(mg/kg)

Asorbic

acid

(mg/kg)

0.10          0.10             0.10         0.30              *3a

Choline

(mg/kg)

*a. As sodium Chloride

*b. Recommendations for horses not exposed to sunlight or to artificial light with an emission spectrum of 280-315 nm.

*c. Blank space indicates that data are insufficient to determine a requirement or maximum tolerable level.

40            50               50              40                1000

0.10          0.10             0.10         0.30              *3a

40            50               50              40                1000

10            10               10              10                 800

40            40               40              40                 500

2               2                 2                   2                

3               3                 3                   5              3000    

.01              .01              .01           .01               5.0

.01              .01              .01           .01               1.0

*c  

50            80               80              80                1000

300            600              800              30            2200

2000         3000           2000          2000             16,000

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